Arts History Update for mid September 2015

18 Sep

Arts History Update for mid September 2015 by David Cummins

www.artshistoryupdates.com

Thomas Stearns Eliot 1888- 1965 referred to familiarly by friends and relatives as Tom, wrote his first poem at age 11 and signed it T.S. Eliot. There you have both his present and future. He was born at St Louis Missouri into a family of wealth due to brick manufacturing, with roots in New England. They were Unitarian and somewhat strictly so and Tom was fascinated by the sights and sounds of the aggressive new city on the Mississippi. Tom submitted his first poem at age 11 to Fireside magazine that was written edited and published by himself. http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/a_f/eliot/life.htm

Tom Eliot suffered ill health as a boy and as an adult and became a poet, a husband, a literary empire-builder, and an employee of Lloyds Bank in London England. He was not either a kind person or a good husband or a good friend. He was quite self-centered and devoted to his own success and eminence.

Robert Crawford, Young Eliot: From St Louis to The Waste Land (Cape 2015 in England, Farrar, Straus & Giroux 2015 in USA)) 512 pages, is volume one of a projected two volume biography of T.S. Eliot. $21.72 hardcover $17 e-book Texas Tech Library PS 3509.L43 Z6545

Eliot College, one of six at University of Kent in Canterbury England, is the longest established (1965 the year of his death) and I had the privilege of residing there for a week one Summer. https://www.kent.ac.uk/locations/canterbury/colleges.html

The Waste Land (1922) is a masterpiece http://www.shmoop.com/the-waste-land/table-of-contents.html and you may read it here http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/176735 generally regarded as one of the greatest poems of the 20th century, and was received with acclaim. http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/belief/2014/apr/17/ts-eliot-waste-land-radical-text-wounded-culture

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Anna Christina Soy Ribeiro is an associate professor of philosophy at Texas Tech, was appointed an Integrated Scholar in 2012 at Tech, received a Quinn Fellowship at the National Humanities Center http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org in 2013-2014 spending a year there on leave, and her primary field of interest is philosophy of art and aesthetics http://www.depts.ttu.edu/provost/scholars/annaribeiro.php specifically focusing on aesthetic aspects and the cultural significance of poetry. Here is her website https://sites.google.com/site/annachristinaribeiro/ She defends aesthetics http://www.aestheticsforbirds.com/2014/03/the-philosophical-importance-of_22.html at this blog site.

Born and raised in Brazil she received a bachelor’s degree in Leuven The Netherlands and another at Hunter College, City University of New York,

and her Ph.D. from University of Maryland at College Park in 2006. She has been on the faculty at Texas Tech since then.

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Ur is an ancient Mesopotamia [land between the rivers] site in southern Iraq in existence by 6500 BCE and by 3500 BCE it was a major city, cultural center and crossroads. Archaeological excavations in the 1920s led to C. Leonard Wooley, Ur of the Chaldees: A Record of Seven Years of Excavations (1930) and Ur of the Chaldees: The Final Account Excavations at Ur (1954) revised and updated by Peter Roger Stuart Moorey (1982) Texas Tech Library DS 70.5.U7 W63. New excavations are under way there in 2015 as there is more to learn. The International Association of Assyriology http://iaassyriology.org will hold its July 11-15, 2016 conference in Philadelphia PA titled Ur in the 21st Century.

A recent book is Harriet Crawford, Ur The City of the Moon God (Bloomsbury 2015) 147 pages $87.65 hardcover $28.45 paperback $15.39 e-book Texas Tech Library electronic download. Crawford wrote Sumer and the Sumerians (2nd ed., Cambridge University Press 2004) Texas Tech Library DS 72.C73 so this new book is received with respect.

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1st Annual Caprock Jazz Festival at Texas Tech Student Union Building Allen Theatre three concerts on Saturday September 19 the first at 3:00 pm Texas Tech Alumni Jerry Serrano, Joy Harris and Quamon Fowler will perform, at 6:00 pm Helen Sung Quintet will perform, and at 8:00 pm Tom Braxton, Rick Braun and Kirk Whalum will perform $35 and on Sunday September 20 at McKenzie Merket Alumni Center at 8:00 am Pancakes and Praise Breakfast with Jazz artists’ testimonies $20. A free Jazz Worship Service will occur at 10:00 am in the Hance Chapel next door to the east.

Tickets either at select a seat or at website www.caprockjazzfestival.com benefits the Caviel African American Museum and Cultural Arts Center at 1719 Avenue A in Lubbock and the entire East Lubbock Gateway project on Avenue A from 19th to 23rd Streets.

On Monday September 21 the out of town jazz artists will conduct a free jazz workshop / clinic for area music students, teenagers on up, in the Music Building at Texas Tech at 9:00 am.

Roots Historical Arts Council http://rootscouncil.weebly.com is a Lubbock organization that is spurring the East Lubbock Gateway Project. Its spokesperson is Eric Strong. Alfred and Billie Caviel operated a pharmacy at 1719 Avenue A for more than 40 years. Alfred passed away and Billie is retired so this building was donated as a space for the Caviel African American Museum and Cultural Arts Center. It opened in June 2015 phone for hours 806-928-4168 http://www.everythinglubbock.com/news/klbk-news/caviels-pharmacy-transformed-into-african-american-museum-sneak-peak and http://amarillo.com/news/latest-news/2015-06-23/african-american-museum-celebrates-grand-opening-lubbock

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https://abagond.wordpress.com/2009/10/08/langston-hughes-on-wanting-to-be-white/ Langston Hughes’s article for the Nation Magazine The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain (1926) became the manifesto for the Harlem Renaissance. Here is the essay http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/g_l/hughes/mountain.htm It was true then and is true today. We are still interested in Hughes 1902-1967. Selected Letters of Langston Hughes (Arnold Rampersad & David Roessel eds., Alfred A Knopf 2015) Texas Tech Library PS 3515.U274 Z48 and Langston Hughes, The Weary Blues (1926 collection of poems, reissued Alfred A Knopf 2015) 128 pages. His next collection of poems was published the very next year Fine Clothes to the Jew (1927) Texas Tech Library PS 3515.U274 F5.

On May 22, 1967 Hughes died from complications after abdominal surgery related to prostate cancer, at the age of 65. His ashes are interred beneath a floor medallion in the middle of the foyer in the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem. It is the entrance to an auditorium named for him. The design on the floor is an African cosmogram entitled Rivers. The title is taken from his poem The Negro Speaks of Rivers (1921). Within the center of the cosmogram is the line “My soul has grown deep like the rivers”.

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John Liggett Meigs 1916-2003

Mark S. Fuller, Never a Dull Moment: The Life of John Liggett Meigs (Sunstone Press 2015) paperback $28.95 Amazon.com at 484 pages ABE Books new $27.12 incl s&h e-book $23 http://www.sunstonepress.com/cgi-bin/bookview.cgi?_recordnum=940 and see

John Meigs (Roswell New Mexico Museum of Art 1962) catalogue for an exhibition of John Meigs paintings sketches and drawings September 2 – October 12, 1962 and here is a list of art pieces given by John Meigs to the Roswell Museum and Arts Center http://roswellmuseum.pastperfect-online.com/36727cgi/mweb.exe?request=keyword;keyword=meigs;dtype=d at 100 West 11th Street.

Bio of John Meigs http://www.stevensfineart.com/bio.php?artistId=3151&artist=John%20Liggett%20Meigs He was close friends with Peter Hurd and his family at the Hondo Valley’s Sentinel Ranch. Meigs lived at nearby San Patricio New Mexico near Ruidoso.

He was represented for sale of art at The Baker Collectors Gallery in Lubbock Texas. Therein lies a tale. Lennis and James Baker, brothers, operated a printing press at 6th Street and Avenue T in Lubbock in the 1930s and that soon became Baker Printing Company. It morphed into an office supplies store Baker Office Products and then The Baker Company over the next 50 years. The Baker Company opened an art gallery from which many Lubbock citizens purchased fine art The Baker Collectors Gallery. John Meigs, Peter Hurd, Henriette Wyeth and members of the Hurd and Wyeth families all placed original art there for sale. In 1996 The Baker Company was sold to Brian McPeak. In May 2015 it was announced that Baker Office Products is merged into Officewise Furniture & Supply Co that previously acquired Hester’s McGlaun Office Supply and Furniture. The combined operations of Officewise will be at 1301 13th Street in downtown Lubbock. http://lubbockonline.com/business/2015-05-24/baker-office-products-merges-officewise-furniture-and-supply#.VeIZI8K9SOY

Meigs own papers and collection pieces are at the Institute of Historical Survey Foundation http://www.ihsf.org/Collections/MeigsCollection.html at Las Cruces New Mexico.

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Donald Trump, all over the media, is a gluttonous episode of narcissism, rudeness, frivolity and xenophobia. The visit of Pope Francis to the United States may seem all the more welcome and refreshing.

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The Bronx Museum of the Arts 1040 Grand Concourse at E. 165th Street has an exhibit “iPRESENTE! The Young Lords in New York” recounting the late 1960s when a group of rebellious Puerto Rico nationalists sought empowerment for their New York City communities. The manifesto grandly called for a Socialist Society but more practically it asked for improvements to hospitals in Latino communities, protested institutional racism, and more http://www.bronxmuseum.org/exhibitions/presente-the-young-lords-in-new-york

Exhibit continues to October 18 at three locations Bronx Museum, El Museo del Barrio 1230 5th Avenue http://www.elmuseo.org/the-young-lords-in-new-york/ and Loisaida Center 710 9th Street Lower East Side http://loisaida.org/presente-the-young-lords-in-new-york/

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178 mile stretch of Route 66 in Texas is now recognized by the Texas Legislature as Route 66 Historic Corridor https://legiscan.com/gaits/subject/82401 Folks from Chicago to Los Angeles and points between weren’t “going to Texas, they were passing through” and today they arrive at Shamrock, McLean, Alanreed, Groom, Conway, Amarillo, Cadillac Ranch, Vega, Adrian and Glenrio [Route 66 ghost town that straddles the Texas New Mexico boundary http://www.legendsofamerica.com/tx-glenrio.html ], east to west. http://rt66oftexas.com Travelers on Interstate Highway 40 must get off it to access stretches of Route 66 that are still maintained or drivable. A 7.2 mile stretch of old Route 66 west of Conway Texas is an example http://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/route66/sh_207_interstate_40_conway.html Its designation today is Farm to Market Road 2161 in Carson County Texas. http://www.historic66.com/description/map.html is map of Route 66. West of Oklahoma City Route 66 and IH 40 are parallel.

Sights to see along the way east to west are The Tower Station and U-Drop Inn and Tower Cafe at Shamrock Texas http://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/route66/tower_station_u-drop-inn_cafe_shamrock.html and a bridge over a railroad line 8 miles east of Shamrock http://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/route66/bridge_over_chicago_rock_island_gulf_rr_shamrock.html

Devil’s Rope [i.e., barbed wire] Museum at McLean Texas http://www.barbwiremuseum.com/index.htm

Loop 271 at Alanreed Texas https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alanreed,_Texas

Giant Cross at Groom Texas http://www.roadsideamerica.com/tip/1912 http://www.roadsideamerica.com/tip/1912

VW Slug Bug Ranch, partially buried Volkswagen beetle automobiles, at Conway http://www.roadsideamerica.com/tip/6767

Ranchotel at 2501 West 6th Avenue, Amarillo http://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/route66/ranchotel_amarillo.html

Cadillac Ranch west of Amarillo off IH 40 south frontage road that parallels Route 66 is a public art sculpture installation in 1974 by Chip Lord, Hudson Marquez and Doug Michels, part of the art group Ant Farm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadillac_Ranch

Vega Motel at 1005 Vega Boulevard in Vega http://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/route66/vega_motel.html constructed in 1947 on the Mother Road Route 66

Midpoint between Chicago and Los Angeles was Adrian Texas http://www.legendsofamerica.com/tx-adrian.html now “a wide spot in the road”.

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Texas State Fair is September 25-October 18, 2015 at Fair Park, Dallas and hosts 3 million visitors each year. Go ahead and be one during the 24 day run http://bigtex.com

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Saturdays at LHUCA Louise Hopkins Underwood Center for the Arts Exploring Contemporary Art continues September 19 at 11:30 am – 1:00 pm at LHUCA Warehouse 602 Avenue I [before Avenue I becomes Texas Avenue].

Don’t be confused by addresses. East of University Avenue to the underpass below the Santa Fe Railroad bridge, 6th Street was renamed Mac Davis Lane so the main LHUCA Building is between 5th Street and Mac Davis Lane on Avenue K. Its address is 511 Avenue K. To the east the LHUCA Christine DeVitt Icehouse is located between 5th Street and Mac Davis Lane on Avenue J. Charles Adams Gallery is located on the southwest corner of the intersection of Avenue J and Mac Davis Lane but because it fronts Avenue J its address is 602 Avenue J. To the east of that intersection is the intersection of Avenue I and Mac Davis Lane and the LHUCA Warehouse is located on the southwest corner of that intersection. Since it fronts on Avenue I its address is 602 Avenue I but the side door on Mac Davis Lane address would be 1001 Mac Davis Lane.

Inside the Warehouse is an art installation by Kathy Kelley. At 11:30 am Christian Conrad Ph.D. will provide a lecture on installation art and then at 12:15 pm Kathy Kelley will discuss her exhibited installation piece Archiving the Distensions of Memory or Monsters in the Attic. The event is free.

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